Funded Academic-Community Proposals

    UC San Diego, Clinical and Translational Research Institute

Academic-Community Partnership Pilot Grants

Project Period:

Principal Investigator (Department); Community Partner/Agency

Project Title

4/1/14-3/31/15 Kate Murray, PhD, UCSD Department of Family & Preventive Medicine; with United Taxi Workers of San Diego Improving Taxi Driver Health and Access to health Care
Brief Project Description
The UC San Diego Department of Family and Preventive Medicine and the United Taxi Workers of San Diego (UTWSD) are partnering to support the reduction of health and health care disparities among San Diego taxi drivers. The goals of the partnership include the following : increasing awareness of health profiles of taxi drivers in San Diego; developing a collaborative relationship between UC San Diego School of Medicine and UTWSD to bridge health education programs to undeserved taxi drivers in San Diego; and increasing health care coverage of taxi drivers through targeted education and outreach efforts related to the Affordable Care Act.
Impact of the Project
It is well-documented that African-American men experience significant health disparities, yet very little is currently known about the unique health profiles of African born men following immigration to the U.S. Dr. Murray’s project in partnership with the United Taxi Workers of San Diego will collect invaluable data to assist health professionals in determining the current health status and health needs of African men who are taxi drivers, and a matched group of African men who are not taxi drivers (70 percent of the approximately 2,050 taxi drivers in San Diego are East African men). Data to be collected will include assessments of: musculoskeletal pain and disorders, hypertension, obesity, smoking history, fatigue, sleep quality and duration, symptoms of depression and anxiety, gastrointestinal disturbances, and factors related to the work environment (e.g. job stress, hours worked, sedentary behavior). In addition, UTWSD and UC San Diego School of Medicine will host a health fair for taxi drivers and their families to increase access to important health screenings and health information, including information on the Affordable Care Act and sustainable health care options. Data collected for this project will document the extent of health and health care disparities in this population, as well as provide feedback to drivers on their personal health profile and strategies for promoting health. The study will provide much needed preliminary research to support further research and the development of prevention and intervention strategies to improve taxi driver health. The study may also serve as a cost-effective model for reaching other marginalized, underserved populations, many of whom suffer from significant health disparities as well as occupational hazards.  

 

Project Period:

Principal Investigator (Department); Community Partner/Agency

Project Title

4/1/14-3/31/15 Jamila Stockman, PhD, UCSD Division of Global Public Health; with Christie's Place The Role of Peer Navigators and Social Support in the HIV Care Continuum: Perceptions of HIV-Positive Women
Brief Project Description
Increasing access to care and improving health outcomes for people living with HIV are cornerstones of the President’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy. Extant data suggests that timely initiation of and sustained adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce HIV transmission by more than 90 percent. Achieving viral suppression in HIV-infected individuals confers benefits to the treated individual, sexual partners, and to the community. However, only one in four HIV positive people in the U.S. make it through the entire HIV care continuum (diagnosis, linkage to care, retention in care, ART initiation and adherence) to achieve this goal. In San Diego, an estimated 57 percent of HIV-positive women are not accessing care. This public health crisis warrants urgent attention, given that HIV/AIDS continues to disproportionately affect women of color in San Diego where most HIV-related resources are currently devoted to men who have sex with men. The San Diego HIV Prevention Community Planning Group has emphasized the need to bridge this gap for HIV-positive women via outreach and services. Peer Navigation services have helped HIV-positive patients better negotiate their care. However, evidence suggests drawing support from one’s social network may further strengthen patients’ care negotiation.
Impact of the Project
Dr. Stockman’s project with Christie’s Place will provide important information on the utility of HIV-positive Peer Navigators in helping other HIV-positive women access care and make it through the care continuum. They will also gain insight into how to effectively address barriers to care (e.g., lack of transportation, lack of childcare assistance). Their data will be used to provide recommendations to enhance current services provided by “Coordinated HIV Assistance and Navigation for Growth and Empowerment (CHANGE) for Women,” and develop an intervention manual to accompany a subsequent study testing a culturally tailored Social Support Network-based intervention supplementing the role of Peer Navigators to improve outcomes along the care continuum. By assuring that HIV positive women have access to the services they need for timely initiation of and sustained adherence to antiretroviral therapy, treated individuals will experience reduced morbidity and mortality, and HIV transmission could be reduced by more than 90 percent, benefiting sexual partners, and the greater community.
Project Period:

Principal Investigator (Department); Community Partner/Agency

Project Title

4/1/13-3/31/14 Gregory Light, PhD (Psychiatry); with Alpine Special Treatment Center Predicting Cognitive Enhancement Following Intensive Neuroplasticity-Based Training Intervention in Schizophrenia
Brief Project Description
Foster a partnership between UCSD Schizophrenia Research Program and Alpine Special Treatment Center (ASTCI) with the aim of indentifying neurophysiologic predictors of cognitive response to neuroplasticity-based auditory training intervention in schizophrenic (SZ) patients.
Impact of the Project
This project is undergoing revisions and awaiting IRB approval of the revised protocol. The research team and Alpine Special Treatment Center expect to gain valuable pilot data on which to base future external grant applications focused on the identification of neurophysiologic predictors of cognitive response to neuroplasticity-based auditory training interventions in SZ patients. The project will examine how a sustainable academic-community partnership between the UCSD investigators and ASTCI may effectively administer cognitive-enhancing auditory training interventions and identify biomarker predictors of treatment response that will be supported by external funding. If improved outcomes of this treatment method are identified, the healthcare costs associated with schizophrenia could be reduced, as well as many related costs from inadequately treated patients (e.g. violence, other crimes).
Project Period:

Principal Investigator (Department); Community Partner/Agency

Project Title

4/1/13-3/31/14 Monica Ulibarri, PhD (Psychiatry); with the San Diego County Office of Education Assessment of risk factors for commercial sexual exploitation of high risk adolescent children (CSEC) in San Diego Community Projects
Brief Project Description
Collect, analyze, and interpret descriptive data to better understand the risk factors of “commercial sexual exploitation of children” (CSEC); develop an in-depth interview guide for use in examining risk factors for CSEC; and establish a relationship between the PIs and the San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE).
Impact of the Project
This project is being implemented. The research team anticipates utilizing their pilot data to develop an NIH R01 application for a mixed methods study examining the prevalence, correlates, and risk factors of CSEC among high risk adolescent girls in the U.S.-Mexico border. If mental health issues, substance use, and HIV/STI risk emerge as important themes in this research (as in previous international research with formerly trafficked women and girls), NIH-supported intervention studies among this highly vulnerable population of youth will be sought. In addition, the study will contribute to evidence-based training materials related to CSEC prevention and education, specific to San Diego County to enhance SDCOE’s efforts. These combined benefits could substantially curtail the increasing healthcare and other costs associated with sex trafficking and related crimes.

Project Period:

Principal Investigator (Department); Community Partner/Agency

Project Title

 
4/1/12 – 3/31/13 David C. Chang PhD, MBA, MPH, (Surgery); with San Ysidro High School Stronger Communities through Effective Mentorship and Trauma Prevention Program
Brief Project Description
The purpose of the project was to develop a trauma injury prevention program in conjunction with San Ysidro High School (SYHS). The researchers’ hypothesized that trauma injury prevention is most effective for youth who are more culturally aware. To foster cultural awareness, they designed and implemented a cultural identity seminar series.
Impact of the Project 

Dr. Chang and SYHS plan to use this work in future applications for violence prevention research/program funding requests. Given the healthcare and other costs associated with increased violence, the potential cost savings associated with effective violence prevention programs are astronomical.

Project Period:

Principal Investigator (Department); Community Partner/Agency

Project Title

4/1/12-3/31/13 Jae Kim, MD, PhD (Pediatrics); with the San Diego Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and Community Providers Premature Infant Nutrition Post-discharge Collaborative Project
Brief Project Description
The development of a network of community partners to identify barriers faced by mothers and community pediatric care providers in delivering optimal post-discharge nutrition for premature infants.
Impact of the Project
The information from this pilot is being utilized to design an intervention with the ultimate goal of providing optimal post-discharge nutrition for premature infants. Although it was beyond the scope of the research team to measure the fiscal impact of improved nutrition and increased breastfeeding for premature infants, the impact is implied – the associated morbidity associated with poor nutrition and failure to breastfeed is well-documented. Clear identification of the limitations and obstacles to best practices for preterm nutrition after discharge will inform future research, as well as current practices via the established network’s numerous local pediatric partners, regional, statewide and national forums sponsored by San Diego County Breastfeeding Coalition, California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative (CPQCC), California Breastfeeding Coalition, Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and Pediatric Academic Societies, and others through national and international presentations and publications.
Project Period:

Principal Investigator (Department); Community Partner/Agency

Project Title

 
4/1/12-3/31/13 Carrie R. McDonald, Ph.D., ABPP-CN (Psychiatry); with Epilepsy Foundation of San Diego and Advanced Neurobehavioral Health of Southern California Neuropsychological and Neuroanatomical Profiles of Children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Brief Project Description
The investigation of the nature and extent of cognitive impairment in children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE). (Aim 1)explore the cognitive morbidities of childhood TLE and their relationship to underlying brain morphology; and (Aim 2) provide insight into the impact that an early, ongoing neurological insult such as epilepsy can have on the development of brain and cognition.
Impact of the Project
Prior to receiving the ACTRI Pilot, Dr. McDonald received an NIH/NINDS Patient-Oriented Career Development Award (K-23) and an independent investigator grant (R01)—both to study preoperative neuroimaging and neurocognition in the evaluation of adult epilepsy. Her past success with external funding, the innovative nature of this new research, and her use of cutting-edge imaging at the MMIL and UCSD combine to create a very high potential for pilot-related external grant funding. Also, Dr. McDonald was allowed access to similar data for non-epileptic children to produce groundbreaking comparative analyses, which will likely lead to additional studies (and funding). Future R01 (and other) applications will include these data and increase the visibility of pediatric epilepsy in nationally-funded research. The impact on the costs associated with improved evidence-based treatment for children with TLE could be substantial.